World Growth in the media – Economic situation in EU becomes one of the most widely discussed topics of Davos forum

PenzaNews, 4 February 2013

World Growth Ambassador Alan Oxley provided expert commentary to PenzaNews on the European Crisis and the ability of the World Economic Forum’s participants to understand the issues at hand.

“The Head of the Swiss based bank UBS warned about the complacency over the debt crisis in Europe. The perspective in the rest of the world is that only two options are realistic in Europe – a huge destruction of wealth, the like of which has not been seen for 70 years, or spreading the burden of the debt workout across the people of Europe, flattening growth for a decade or more. The mood at Davos seems to suggest this is not fully understood,” said Ambassador Oxley.

Read the full story here.

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